Lunar Eclipse | 15 May 2022

The skies cleared as evening approached. The Moon was aligned with Earth and the Sun. Their syzygy at 9:30 pm CDT brought the Moon into the umbra of the Earth’s shadow. Desktop software gave a simulated view like this. The faint inner circle is the umbra. The larger circle is the penumbra.

My camera was mounted on a tripod and set for capturing images about every 15 minutes starting at 9:30. The images were cropped to place the umbra in nearly the same place in each image. That placement highlighted the movement of the Moon over the 15 minute time periods between photos.

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Galilean Moon Events | 15 Aug 2021

The four largest moons of Jupiter are Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto. First seen by Galileo Galilei in December 1609 or January 1610, he described them as satellites in orbit of Jupiter in March 1610. They are easily seen near the planet using a simple telescope or a steadied pair of binoculars. They are currently well placed with Jupiter in the evening sky to the southeast soon after sunset.

Imagine being high above Jupiter looking down at the planet and the four moons. Desktop planetarium software is very helpful here. In this view, Jupiter is centered. The Sun is far to the left off-screen. The moons are labeled in each of their orbits. The fastest is Io closest to Jupiter. Callisto is the slowest. Three of the moon have shadow lines drawn in orange. Play the video and watch their movements. The shadows cast by each of those three moons are intercepted by Jupiter. The software speeded up the rate many times.

What would this event look like for viewers on Earth? Earth would be located far off-screen to the left toward the Sun. Could we see the shadows cast by the moons upon the cloud tops of Jupiter? Again, software can simulate the view accurately. The answer is yes. Earthlings with powerful amateur telescopes are capable of seeing the shadows.

Play the video and watch for several things in this simulation. The first is Callisto casting its shadow on Jupiter. Over the course of several hours, it moves across the entire face of the planet. Next, Ganymede and Europa approach from the left. At 24 sec in the video, both of their shadows are cast. Also, Callisto’s shadow moves off the planet and the moon Io disappears into the shadow of Jupiter just off the right limb of the planet.

Watch at the 30 sec time how Europa is occulted by Ganymede. Both shadows are still visible but they become one briefly at the 32 sec mark. Finally, at 38 sec, both moons and their shadows are off to the right. Did you notice how Io emerged to the left of Jupiter in the distance? You might need to view both of these videos a few times.

On 15 August 2021, the moons were actually positioned as in my simulation above for viewers in the western Pacific region. Christopher Go of Cebu City, Philippines, captured images that night. He was fortunate to enjoy clear sky conditions for the duration of these events. His images are posted on his site. Scroll down his page until you reach August 15, 2021. The Astronomy Picture of the Day APOD highlighted his work.

Annular Solar Eclipse | 10 Jun 2021

This morning the Sun was in annular eclipse for a small part of the world. Parts of Canada, Greenland, as well as northern Siberia, were graced with views. At sunrise here in the midwest of the U.S. I was not able to see any of it. Instead, I went to Time and Date for live telescopic views streamed from several locations. The views were excellent from Science North, a science center located in northern Ontario in the city of Sudbury. The Sun rose with the Moon covering most of it illustrated by this screen shot.

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Annular Eclipse | Sri Lanka | 26Dec2019

A solar eclipse took place on 26 Dec 2019 visible from Saudi Arabia to Guam, crossing India, Sri Lanka, and Indonesia. It took place during the night of Christmas for those of us in the U.S. I stayed up to watch it online a little before 10 pm.

Fred Espenak, NASA’s GSFC

The Astronomical Institute in Sri Lanka webcast the eclipse the entire duration. Their video is here. Annularity begins just before the 2 hour 5 minute mark. I selected the portion of their video showing the beginning to the end of annularity and sped it up by 4x.

Annular Solar Eclipse | 26 Dec 2019

A solar eclipse will occur on 26 Dec 2019 visible from Saudi Arabia to Guam. Because of the Moon’s distance from Earth, it will not quite completely cover the Sun. The result shows a ring of sunlight, or annulus, for those viewing in the centerline. The map below shows the narrow centerline in red. Those people in a wide region farther from the centerline will see a partial covering of the Sun. Follow this link to Eclipse Portal for more specific information on the track through different regions and cities.

For those of us in the Americas, the event takes place at night and won’t be visible. It occurs on Wednesday, December 25th, starting at 7 PM PST | 10 PM EST | 03:00UTC (26th).

Eclipse Predictions by Fred Espenak, NASA’s GSFC – http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/

I have no doubt there will be opportunities to view online. Sites will have solar-filtered telescopes with tracking capability. Here is one such example recorded in 2012.