Gathering of Intelligence | Solvay 1927

I taught physics to high school students for my career. Names of important people in the history of physics, chemistry, and other sciences were always included in our textbooks and discussions. These people laid the foundation for what we believe today about how the world works.

In 1927, many of those individuals gathered for the Solvay Conference in Brussels. The colorized photograph below may have captured the most intelligence in one place and time the world has seen. Of the 29 attendees, 17 had won, or would go on to win, the Nobel Prize. Notable in the front row is the only woman at the conference, Marie Curie. She had won two Nobel Prizes in physics and in chemistry.

The primary mission of the conference was to discuss the impact of a new theory embraced by the man at the far right in the second row. The scientist Neils Bohr strongly supported the theory of quantum mechanics. He and Werner Heisenberg argued for what is called the Copenhagen Interpretation. In it, physical systems have a set of probabilities of outcomes if they are going to be measured. The act of measurement causes that set of possible probabilities to reduce to one outcome. Albert Einstein, center front row, did not like the idea of probabilities in nature. He said “God does not play dice”. Bohr replied “Einstein, stop telling God what to do”. Quantum mechanics is widely accepted today and is applied in many aspects of our lives.

The scientific contributions by each of the pictured individuals are described at this link. Scroll part way down that page to find them.