Saturn’s Icy Moons | Then and Now

The twin Voyager spacecraft went by Saturn in the early 80s and imaged several moons. During the recent 10 years, Cassini has orbited Saturn and imaged the same moons many times with greater coverage and detail. Here is the link to a web page from Jet Propulsion Laboratory that shows the level of detail before and after of those mission images. This screenshot below is also linked to their web page. You must visit their web page to view the images.

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11 thoughts on “Saturn’s Icy Moons | Then and Now

  1. These maps are fantastic! I had seen some of the new color maps before, but I’m pretty sure those were not swipe-able like these. Saturn has some of my favorite moons, so this is a treat!

    Liked by 1 person

    • I thought of your attraction to the moons. They are some of the most intriguing objects that conceal many mysteries. Explorations of them will be exciting.

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  2. I had no idea that the rings were a result of the misting and chunks of ice from the moons…does the color of the rings follow the same theory as presented with these moon shots?

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  3. Thus the philosophical question is answered. Stuff happens even when no one is watching. “If a tree falls in the forest . . . ” Also, What You See Is What You Get (WYSIWYG).

    Exploration of planetary moons may seem pointless to many, but it provides more small but consistently-interlocking tiles to the jigsaw puzzle of what the universe is and how we came to be. Good stuff.

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  4. Thanks for the link, now I perhaps understand why it’s so fascinating to see how far astrophotography has come: “Colors in the maps represent a broader range than human vision, extending slightly into infrared and ultraviolet wavelengths. Differences in color across the moons’ surfaces that are subtle in natural-color views become much easier to study in these enhanced colors”.

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